Sunflower

Prices for both NuSun and high-oleic sunflower fluctuated up and down during the middle of February, providing no specific direction to producers.

“Old crop prices were unchanged to up 10 cents,” said John Sandbakken, executive director of the National Sunflower Association, writing in NSA’s weekly newsletter on Feb. 18. “New crop NuSun prices were down 10 cents to unchanged with new crop high-oleic mixed at down 10 cents to up 15 cents.”

Looking at prices at the region’s crush plants, as of Feb. 18, NuSun sunflower was listed at $19.25 per hundredweight for delivery in March at Cargill in West Fargo, N.D., and $19.05 at ADM in Enderlin, N.D.

High-oleic prices were $19.50 at West Fargo and $19.35 at Enderlin for March delivery. Elsewhere in North Dakota, high-oleic prices for delivery in January and February were $19.50 at Pingree and $18.70 at Hebron for delivery for January and February.

NuSun new crop prices for 2020 were listed at $18.50 cash and $18.20 with an Act of God clause (AOG) at West Fargo, and $18.60 cash and $18.10 with an AOG at Enderlin.

2020 new crop high oleic sunflower at ADM in Enderlin was listed at $19.10 cash and $18.60 with an AOG. At Cargill in West Fargo, new crop high-oleic prices were listed at $18.50 cash and $18.20 with an AOG.

Elsewhere in North Dakota, the price for 2020 new crop high-oleic sunflower was listed at $18.60 cash at Pingree. At Cargill in Hebron the new crop price was posted at $17.40 cash and $17.10 with an AOG, while at ADM in Hebron the cash price was $17.90 and the price with an AOG was $17.40.

Sandbakken also pointed out that the crop insurance price discovery process continues for 2020 crop insurance price elections. As of Feb. 18, oil type sunflowers were at $17.10 and confections are $22.90 per cwt., unchanged from the previous week.

Final price elections will be announced in early March.

With the sunflower and soybean markets linked together, Sandbakken noted that sunflower often keeps a close watch on what’s happening in the soybean market. In that regard, he said USDA and the sunflower market are watching current events affecting the soybean market.

“USDA doesn't expect a big bump in soybean prices this year even with the new U.S./China trade pact set to take effect on Feb. 14,” Sandbakken said. “In its monthly report on global farm supply and demand, the department predicted higher soybean exports but lowered expected prices for soybeans by 25 cents a bushel.”

Also, in its February report USDA raised global soybean production slightly to 339.4 million metric tons (MMT) from 337.7 million in January.

“Brazil is now expected to produce 125 MMT of soybeans, keeping it as the world’s biggest grower, up from last month’s outlook for 123 million,” he said.

USDA also pegged world soybean inventories at 98.9 MMT for the end of the 2019-2020 marketing year. That’s up from the prior outlook of 96.7 million tons.

Another matter of global importance which is having an impact on several commodities is the coronavirus, which has spread across the world from China.

“Traders also are keeping an eye on the spread of the coronavirus,” Sandbakken said. “Price gains have been limited due to economic growth concerns in China due to the disease outbreak.”

As the 2020 crop production season begins with producers in the region looking ahead to spring planting, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is beginning its annual survey of producers. This month, USDA will begin contacting producers nationwide to ask them about their plans for the upcoming growing season.

“NASS will mail the survey questionnaire in February, asking producers to provide information about the types of crops they intend to plant in 2020, how many acres they intend the plant and the amounts of grain and oilseed stored on their farms,” he said, adding that producers are encouraged to respond online or by mail.

“Those producers who do not respond by the deadline may be contacted for a telephone or personal interview,” he said.

Survey results will be published in the Prospective Plantings and quarterly Grain Stocks report to be released on March 31, 2020.

Sunflower prices mixed as March approaches

By MARK CONLON

For Farm & Ranch Guide

Prices for both NuSun and high-oleic sunflower fluctuated up and down during the middle of February, providing no specific direction to producers.

“Old crop prices were unchanged to up 10 cents,” said John Sandbakken, executive director of the National Sunflower Association, writing in NSA’s weekly newsletter on Feb. 18. “New crop NuSun prices were down 10 cents to unchanged with new crop high-oleic mixed at down 10 cents to up 15 cents.”

Looking at prices at the region’s crush plants, as of Feb. 18, NuSun sunflower was listed at $19.25 per hundredweight for delivery in March at Cargill in West Fargo, N.D., and $19.05 at ADM in Enderlin, N.D.

High-oleic prices were $19.50 at West Fargo and $19.35 at Enderlin for March delivery. Elsewhere in North Dakota, high-oleic prices for delivery in January and February were $19.50 at Pingree and $18.70 at Hebron for delivery for January and February.

NuSun new crop prices for 2020 were listed at $18.50 cash and $18.20 with an Act of God clause (AOG) at West Fargo, and $18.60 cash and $18.10 with an AOG at Enderlin.

2020 new crop high oleic sunflower at ADM in Enderlin was listed at $19.10 cash and $18.60 with an AOG. At Cargill in West Fargo, new crop high-oleic prices were listed at $18.50 cash and $18.20 with an AOG.

Elsewhere in North Dakota, the price for 2020 new crop high-oleic sunflower was listed at $18.60 cash at Pingree. At Cargill in Hebron the new crop price was posted at $17.40 cash and $17.10 with an AOG, while at ADM in Hebron the cash price was $17.90 and the price with an AOG was $17.40.

Sandbakken also pointed out that the crop insurance price discovery process continues for 2020 crop insurance price elections. As of Feb. 18, oil type sunflowers were at $17.10 and confections are $22.90 per cwt., unchanged from the previous week.

Final price elections will be announced in early March.

With the sunflower and soybean markets linked together, Sandbakken noted that sunflower often keeps a close watch on what’s happening in the soybean market. In that regard, he said USDA and the sunflower market are watching current events affecting the soybean market.

“USDA doesn't expect a big bump in soybean prices this year even with the new U.S./China trade pact set to take effect on Feb. 14,” Sandbakken said. “In its monthly report on global farm supply and demand, the department predicted higher soybean exports but lowered expected prices for soybeans by 25 cents a bushel.”

Also, in its February report USDA raised global soybean production slightly to 339.4 million metric tons (MMT) from 337.7 million in January.

“Brazil is now expected to produce 125 MMT of soybeans, keeping it as the world’s biggest grower, up from last month’s outlook for 123 million,” he said.

USDA also pegged world soybean inventories at 98.9 MMT for the end of the 2019-2020 marketing year. That’s up from the prior outlook of 96.7 million tons.

Another matter of global importance which is having an impact on several commodities is the coronavirus, which has spread across the world from China.

“Traders also are keeping an eye on the spread of the coronavirus,” Sandbakken said. “Price gains have been limited due to economic growth concerns in China due to the disease outbreak.”

As the 2020 crop production season begins with producers in the region looking ahead to spring planting, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is beginning its annual survey of producers. This month, USDA will begin contacting producers nationwide to ask them about their plans for the upcoming growing season.

“NASS will mail the survey questionnaire in February, asking producers to provide information about the types of crops they intend to plant in 2020, how many acres they intend the plant and the amounts of grain and oilseed stored on their farms,” he said, adding that producers are encouraged to respond online or by mail.

“Those producers who do not respond by the deadline may be contacted for a telephone or personal interview,” he said.

Survey results will be published in the Prospective Plantings and quarterly Grain Stocks report to be released on March 31, 2020.