Each week it dries up just enough to get another inch of rain. It seems that the wet trend is likely to continue too. We continue to work on planting equipment and haul off the last of our 2018 corn. As much as we’d like to get in the fields, the potential of a weather scare to rally the market would be even more helpful.

As the first week of April has begun, it's the season to be prepping the planters and prepare room for the seed to be delivered. While temperatures have been comfortable, it's been wet enough to this day for zero field work in our area. However there's no room for complaining as we've seen what the farmers in Nebraska and Iowa are dealing with. On our farm, we're trying to finish up delivering grain, and spring soil testing is almost complete as well.  We're very much looking forward to …

Ideus operates a corn and soybean farm with his father, Royce, in Flatville in Champaign County. The sixth-generation farmer is planting his eleventh crop. He said he has learned how to spend his time and resources better, mainly by increasing his focus on soil science. He graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2008 with an ag business degree.

What a roller coaster. We had extreme high to extreme cold temps; too wet to the verge of being too dry. “Soypocalypse” occurred at the U of I plant clinic, caused by phytophthora and rhizoctonia in soybeans. We experienced new diseases — tar spot and Physoderma brown spot — and unexplainable dry down in corn. Early soybean planting had a great advantage. Corn and soybean yields were the best most growers have produced in this area. And corn fungicide and soybean fungicide/insecticide ap…

November overall has not fared well for fall fieldwork in east central Illinois. This week turned out to be no different, between cold weather and snow. Little to no fall anhydrous has been applied and the extended forecast does not look favorable at this point. Growers have tried to do a little tillage when the ground has been firmed up, but with a wet 2-inch snowfall Wednesday night (Nov. 14), this may come to an end. The last of the crops will have to wait for a good freeze to be harv…

Another unproductive week in the area. Wet soils and cool weather kept growers out of the field. A few growers decided to go ahead and make some progress ... it was by no means fit! Some headway was made on finishing up harvesting and working on tillage west of I-57, where they missed the majority of the last rain. Unable to go to the field, growers are starting to consider seed selection for 2019. A lot of choices and considerations to be made. Outlook looks good for progress this next week. 

It was a damp week, and unfortunately not a lot of progress was made. Many growers still have a lot of tillage work to do and little to no anhydrous has been applied in the area. The 4-inch soil temperature finally fell below 50 degrees this week. We received 1 to 2 inches of rain this last week, and the forecast is not favorable for the soil to be fit for progress this week. Let's hope we get one more run and the last of the crops can be harvested. 

A beautiful week to wrap up the majority of harvest 2018. You can drive miles before you see a field that has not been harvested.  Lots of tillage work taking place, as many pushed to get as much done before the rain moved through over the weekend (one-tenth to a half inch). The soil temperature is approaching the steady 50-degree mark, and fall ammonia applications will begin soon. Growers are reassessing their year, and I believe most are more than pleased with one of the best crops th…

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