It is the middle of October and we have not started harvest yet. I am not sure if that is a record for our farm, but we plan to cut early maturity beans this week. I have found a few random green stem soybeans with odd pod counts that are infected with bean pod mottle virus. This is not a concern other than for cutting. We will finish sowing wheat on prevent plant acres this week. Yield reports on corn from others in the area are favorable considering the delayed season and our soil types.

We are welcoming another week of heat to begin October and take moisture out of corn. June corn completed the season several growing degree units ahead despite spending much of the summer behind the 20-year average. Rainfall totals for the growing season have remained 5 to 7 inches above average, with little falling over the last month. Limited harvest is expected to begin in the area for early planted corn. Almost all soybean fields have started yellowing and shedding leaves with the ni…

The last week of hot and dry conditions pushed the crop forward. Cornfields are turning, with stressed areas dying rather than senescing normally. I expect crown and stalk rots will be noticeable in fields, knowing the beginning and the end of the season have been characterized by moisture stress. Soybeans are following the same pattern, with stressed areas turning yellow first. Low populations of bean leaf beetles can be found. Most silage has been chopped and prevent plant acres have b…

The crop continues to progress, with hopes of harvest beginning in earnest toward the middle of October. The yield survey conducted across Bond county estimated corn at 174 bushels per acre and soybeans at 45 bushels per acre. Wide variability existed among the samples that were collected, which proves the difficult start to the growing season. A few soybeans are showing signs of turning and corn is in the final stretch to black layer. 

Another week of good crop progress and moisture to keep things heading toward maturity. Differences between April-, May- and June-planted corn are noticeable. June planting dates are showing the most kernels tipping back and are more than 100 GDUs behind for the season. Southern rust finally took off in corn fields with plenty of moisture, since spores were deposited from the hurricane. Sudden death syndrome is developing in soybeans. Harvest preparations continue, but field work won’t r…

The corn crop is creeping toward physiological maturity with dent stage happening for a lot of the June-planted crop. Variability within fields and from field to field is still the biggest concern when doing ear and kernel counts. I’ve found a few aphids in corn fields, but not at high levels. Livestock producers are gearing up to chop corn silage. Soybeans are taking advantage of late rain to fill pods.

We received additional rainfall during the week and there is more in the forecast. The crop recovered from dry conditions, but soybeans are dying off in low-lying areas from the flooding damage. Waterhemp escapes along with uncontrolled palmer amaranth populations have seeded out for the season. Our June-planted corn is 100 GDUs behind the 20-year average, making cooler temperatures a bigger concern as June-planted corn won’t black layer until October. 

Another week of summer temperatures in the 90s moved the crop along, trying to make up some of the season delay. Fungicide applications to soybeans are continuing. Yield checks on corn and soybeans seem premature with beans still setting pods and the potential for tip-back on corn still a concern. Storms brought heavy winds and rain, and some corn and soybeans leaned as a result. Weekly rainfall totals in a few isolated parts of the neighborhood were over 12 inches! The limited acres of …

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