We will finish harvest 2019 this week in time to spend the holiday with family. Equipment cleanup is next — everything from the combine to the cart probably has some road salt mixed with mud on it. This season was a challenge, but we were blessed with a good crop and great people working with us along the way. As farmers we were reminded to have patience and faith when Mother Nature kept us from going to the field in the spring. In the end, we learned that planting in June can raise a go…

It was a slow week of harvest at our farm and in the area. Field conditions deteriorated following the snowfall and we’ve been forced to load trucks in places that can handle traffic. Backing down long field lanes, dragging mud onto county roads or highways or moving fields in the dark is not ideal for any operation, but it’s part of the end of this season. We received a reminder to complete the County Agricultural Production Survey for USDA. With a majority of the crop now harvested, we…

We are expecting our second snow of the season today (Nov. 11) and temperatures were above 60 yesterday! Harvest continues across the area with acres of corn and soybeans still standing. We completed our hybrid test plot over the weekend with an average of over 225 bushels per acre. Surprisingly, this seems typical for 2019. Aside from field work, we took chickens to the processor last week. Two deer were also harvested from the farm.

The first hard freeze came early on Halloween night and took care of the few remaining green stems in soybeans. Our area received only enough snow to be noticeable on standing crop before it disappeared. We moved into harvesting June-planted corn over the weekend and have been very pleased with yields. Both fungicide and split nitrogen applications have made a favorable difference for crop quality and yield. Moisture is running 18 to 20% in 111 to 113 CRM hybrids. Grain quality and test …

Harvest progress continues in our area, with a lot of beans cut last week prior to 2.5 inches of rain over the weekend. Corn progress is slow as moisture loss is at a standstill. Stalks are beginning to fall apart, with tops down and few leaves remaining. Reports of corn and beans along with double-crop soybeans and milo all suggest respectable yields. With temperatures falling during harvest, field work will be put on hold until spring along with residue breakdown. There are a few rigs …

Harvest activity has been halted for a couple days due to rain. Sometimes a break is welcome and allows time to rest and catch up on the farm or at home. Soybean yields are variable with a slight trend toward mid-maturity over late maturity. A lot of this simply depends on planting date and how acres handled the foot of rain we had earlier in the season. With most of the focus on soybeans, corn harvest is slower, with grain moisture still high. Wheat is seeded and most has emerged.

Harvest progress remains slow in the area for the middle of October. We received almost 3 inches of rain at the end of the week, which slowed activity but helped recently seeded wheat and cover crops germinate. Prior to the temperature dropping to freezing, soybeans were dry but stems were holding onto moisture. Field activity has been a mix between early corn and soybeans with yield reports favorable to this point. As we move into harvesting June corn and later-maturity soybeans we will…

It is the middle of October and we have not started harvest yet. I am not sure if that is a record for our farm, but we plan to cut early maturity beans this week. I have found a few random green stem soybeans with odd pod counts that are infected with bean pod mottle virus. This is not a concern other than for cutting. We will finish sowing wheat on prevent plant acres this week. Yield reports on corn from others in the area are favorable considering the delayed season and our soil types.

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