Adam Casner

Adam Casner farms in Carroll County, growing corn and soybeans. He farms in both the Missouri River bottom in the southern part of the county and on hill ground to the north.

Adam Casner farms in Carroll County, growing corn and soybeans. He farms in both the Missouri River bottom in the southern part of the county and on hill ground to the north.


July 15, 2019

Most early corn has pollinated before this week of hot and dry weather. Anything pollinating in the next week will struggle. No rain in the forecast for the next 10 days. Early stress on beans shouldn’t be a bad thing if we can get rains when we start setting pods.

July 8, 2019

Corn planted in the middle of April is starting to tassel. Some areas, corn on one side of the road is tasseling and on the other it’s V3-V4. A few after-wheat beans are going in the ground, and a few are still replanting beans. Flood water has receded some again, showing the destruction to roads, buildings and fields. River levels are scheduled to be high all the way up into fall, so this situation will continue.

June 28, 2019

Pleasantly surprised with soybean emergence after the 6 inches of rain last week. Most farmers in the area are done planting beans or finishing up what they can get over.

June 24, 2019

Just shy of 6 inches of rain here in the last week has floodwaters back on the rise and many acres of replanted corn and beans underwater. 2019 has been a nightmare from the word go for us this year.

June 17, 2019

Flood water has receded a little bit in the area, but the situation won’t improve much until the river gets below 23 feet or so. Hill country is getting dry and needing a rain.

June 10, 2019

Weather has trended drier, allowing lots of field work to be completed. We should finish planting beans this week and start side dressing and making post herbicide pass on what little corn we have left.

June 3, 2019

We have suffered two major levee breaks between Hardin and Norborne recently on the Missouri River. Water is already 6 feet deep in our shop and parents’ basement. This will knock out over 30,000 acres in this river bottom. Hill areas are drying up and farming able to resume there, but doesn’t look to last too long with the forecast.

May 24, 2019

No progress. More rain and another high river crest this week. Have had the first, second and sixth highest river crests in history in 2019 so far and it’s not even June yet. Our days are filled with patrolling levees and sandbagging.

May 20, 2019

Another week of not much progress. Few farmers in the area were able to plant beans or apply burndown, but most needed a couple more days of drying that we didn’t get.

May 13, 2019

Not much progress since last week. Corn planted right ahead of the rains is trying to make its way above the ground. By the end of the week we should have a pretty good idea how much replant we will have. More doom and gloom in forecast and markets.

May 6, 2019

We’ve had 5.75 inches of rain since last Sunday here. It shut all field work off for the week. Lots of water ponded in fields again. Just starting to dry off and 1-4 inches rain in the forecast for this week.

April 29, 2019

A lot of field work was accomplished here this week. We finished planting what corn acres were possible to get after the flood on Sunday afternoon right before the rain. Anywhere from 1-2 inches of rain has already fallen.

April 22, 2019

Anywhere from six-tenths to 1.9 inches of rain Wednesday night (April 17) here. Lots of sun and wind has helped dry things out. Pending no rain Sunday, field work will break loose again early this week. Flood water is still receding, we possibly could plant corn on some higher ground that was previously flooded by the end of this week.

April 15, 2019

Fields are finally drying out here. Lots of field work starting to go on: Mainly fertilizer application, but a few planters rolling in the area as well. Locally we missed the rain over the weekend and have a few days before the next precip chance. Flood water is moving off better than expected but will still need a drier weather trend to get those acres planted.

April 8, 2019

The calendar has barely hit April and we have already had a fierce battle with the Missouri River, fighting off the all-time highest recorded level at the Waverly gauge. Our levees held but still took on a lot of water from creeks backing up and spilling over high banks. We have 2,000 acres underwater currently and will take months to pump out. It’s still early and we are determined to try and get a corn crop in, but the lack of fertilizing may turn into a blessing, as many acres may have to be flip flopped to get a crop in.

April 3, 2019

Introducing... Adam Casner farms in Carroll County, growing corn and soybeans. He farms in both the Missouri River bottom in the southern part of the county and on hill ground to the north. Casner also has a seed sales business. He is a seventh-generation farmer, and last year he grew the 200th crop on his family’s farm.