Missouri researcher harvests a corn test plot

A University of Missouri researcher harvests a corn test plot in northeast Missouri.

Since the University of Missouri first began publishing corn yield test results in 1937, the goal has been to provide objective information for farmers to help make their seed decisions. The number of entries has grown from fewer than 50 to 215 today.

MU agronomist Bill Wiebold says the test results can help producers parse through all the information and options available.

“The large number of commercial hybrids available makes selection of a superior hybrid difficult,” Wiebold says. “To select intelligently, producers need a reliable, unbiased, up-to-date source of information that will permit valid comparisons among available hybrids. The objective of the (MU testing program) is to provide this information.”

Growers can compare the information across different years and at different sites within their region to get a fuller picture.

This year, many of the non-irrigated hybrid test sites faced dry conditions, which affected yields.

But researchers say even dry years can be useful, providing information about how the hybrids produce during tough conditions.

In a few locations, drought and heat stress caused large variability, and for those locations the data was included in the report, but not included in the region mean.

The 2018 MU corn trials featured several test sites, some irrigated and some not, divided into North, Central, Southwest and Southeast regions.

North

The North region had all non-irrigated sites, located in Canton, Mooresville, Novelty, Albany and Craig. The Albany and Craig test sites had drought stress, causing low yield and high variability, so their data was not included in the region means.

For the three sites included in the region means, NuTech/G2 5FB-4516 had the highest average yield at 199.3 bushels per acre, and the highest total recorded at any site in the region with 275.5 bu./acre at Canton.

Central

The Central region had non-irrigated test sites at Annada, Columbia, Henrietta, Norborne and Truxton. It also had an irrigated test site at Columbia.

For the non-irrigated sites in the region, LG Seeds LG5650VT2RIB had the highest average yield at 231.6 bu./acre.

The highest total recorded at any non-irrigated site in the region was AgVenture AV8614AM with 277.2 bu./acre at Annada.

At the irrigated test site in Columbia, AgVEnture AV8113AM had the highest yield with 246.6 bu./acre.

Southwest

The Southwest region had non-irrigated test sites at Adrian, Urich and Lamar, as well as irrigated test sites at Adrian, Garden City and Lamar. The non-irrigated and irrigated test sites at Lamar faced drought and heat stress, causing low yields and large variability, so their data was included in the report but not included in the region means.

For the region’s two remaining non-irrigated sites, MorCorn MC 4319 VT2P RIB had the highest average yield with 209.4 bu./acre and the highest total of any non-irrigated site in the region, with 220.3 bu./acre at Adrian.

For the two remaining irrigated sites in the region, LG Seeds LG5643VT2RIB had the highest average yield at 221.5 bu./acre. The highest total recorded at any irrigated site in the region was Dekalb Standard 1# with 235.0 bu./acre at Garden City.

Southeast

The Southeast region had irrigated test sites at Charleston and Oran. For these two sites, LG Seeds LG5650VT2RIB had the highest average yield at 241.9 bu./acre, and the highest total recorded at any site in the region with 263.9 bu./acre at Charleston.

Ben Herrold is Missouri field editor, writing for Missouri Farmer Today, Iowa Farmer Today and Illinois Farmer Today.