Skip to main content
You are the owner of this article.
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Northwest Missouri farmer watches July-planted soybeans

Northwest Missouri farmer watches July-planted soybeans

Kirk Ellis

Kirk Ellis was working through harvest while still hoping his late-planted soybeans continued to develop and increase yield.

HARDIN, Mo. — It has been an unusual year in Northwest Missouri, and as a result Ray County farmer Kirk Ellis was working through harvest while still hoping his late-planted soybeans continued to develop and increase yield.

Warm weather in late September and early October had helped the late crop and given a clear window for harvest progress.

“I had a lot of late beans,” Ellis says. “I’m sure the warmer days will help them. We were planting up until the 25th (of July). Some guys were planting on the first of August. I guess it’s better than growing weeds.”

The wet spring had caused the planting delays and replant for some, particularly in the Missouri River bottom.

But harvest was seeing better progress, despite some October rain. Speaking Oct. 12, Ellis says he had recently finished corn harvest after starting back in September.

“We got all of our corn picked,” he says. “It was decent; it wasn’t great.”

His soybean harvest had just started, and would be somewhat spread out given the wide variety in planting dates.

“Now we’re starting to cut beans,” Ellis says. “We cut beans for about two days and then it rained.”

He expects the soybean harvest progress to pick up once conditions dry out after the latest rain. Ellis says much of the corn in the area has been harvested, but soybean harvest is still in the early stages, as most farmers had been waiting for the crop to dry down.

He says one local elevator had a sign saying they wouldn’t take beans over 16% moisture. He had a field of beans testing 17% in the evening and in the morning, but by the time he got to cutting around 4 p.m. the next afternoon they had dried down to 10 or 11% moisture due to the warm weather and steady wind.

He is expecting a decent soybean crop, if not spectacular.

“I think they’re going to be OK, but I don’t look for them to be very good,” Ellis says.

AgUpdate Daily Headlines

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Ben Herrold is Missouri field editor, writing for Missouri Farmer Today, Iowa Farmer Today and Illinois Farmer Today.

Related to this story

Find the equipment you're looking for

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News