Cattle in pasture

Cattle graze in a pasture after a rainstorm in southern Deuel County, S.D.

There are a lot of products on the shelves at veterinary clinics. To choose the appropriate drug, consider how many times you will be able to give the drug, what the labeled indications are, what the meat withdrawal time is, and how much it is going to cost.

Note that listed below are the labeled indications. Only your veterinarian can prescribe an antibiotic for extra-label purposes if prescribed using conditions set by the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act of 1994 and the FDA’s regulations.

Lainie Kringen-Scholtz

Lainie Kringen-Scholtz

This an overview of the antibiotics that live on our shelf. They are all broad-spectrum antibiotics and are listed under their respective drug classes.

This data is accurate to my knowledge. Please contact your veterinarian if you have questions and always double check the labels on your antibiotics.

Thank you for always administering medications in accordance with Beef Quality Assurance guidelines!

Penicillins

Penicillins

- Ampicillin (Polyflex)

- Administered daily for up to seven days

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat withdrawal: Six days

- Price: $

- Fun Fact: Ampicillin is more broad-spectrum compared to penicillin. Many practices no longer routinely prescribe penicillin with the main reason being that we have the choice of other longer lasting, more broad spectrum antibiotics.

Tetracyclines

• Oxytetracycline (LA100/200/300)

- Administered once or daily for up to four days

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia, pinkeye, footrot, diphtheria, E. coli scours, wooden tongue, lepto

- Meat withdrawal: 28 days

- Price: $

- Fun Fact: LA 300 has 300 milligrams per milliliter whereas LA 100 has 100 mg/ml. So 17 ml LA 300 would have the same amount of oxytetracycline as 50 ml of LA 100.

Cephalosporins

• Ceftiofur sodium (Naxcel) and Ceftiofur hydrochloride (Excenel RTU EZ)

- Administered every day for 3 days

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia, footrot

- Meat withdrawal: Four days

- Price: $$

- Fun Fact: Naxcel has to be mixed with sterile water, where as Excenel RTU is “Ready To Use.”

• Ceftiofur crystalline free acid (Excede)

- Administered once

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia, footrot

- Meat withdrawal: 13 days

- Price: $$$

- Fun Fact: Give at the base of the ear. If a large amount, split between ear bases.

Phenicols

• Florfenicol (Resflor Gold)

- Administered once

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat Withdrawal: 38 days

- Price: $$

- Fun Fact: Resflor Gold also has an anti-inflammatory called flunixin (Banamine) added to it to decrease inflammation in the lung. Nuflor is this same drug without the flunixin.

Macrolides

Tilmicosin (Micotil)

- Administered once

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat withdrawal: 42 days

- Price: $$$

- Not-So-Fun Fact: If a human is injected, Micotil can cause fatal cardiac injury

• Tulathromycin (Draxxin)

- Administered once

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia, pinkeye, footrot

- Meat Withdrawal: 18 days

- Price: $$$

- Fun Fact: Concentration in the lungs is much greater than throughout the rest of the body

• Tildipirosin (Zuprevo)

- Administered once

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat Withdrawal: 21 days

- Price: $$$

- Fun Fact: Easy to dose at 1 ml per 100 pounds of body weight

• Gamithromycin (Zactran)

- Administered once

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat Withdrawal: 35 days

- Price: $$

- Fun Fact: Zactran reaches the lungs within 30 minutes of administration

Fluoroquinolones

• Enrofloxacin (Baytril)

- Administered once or repeated four to five days later

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat Withdrawal: 28 days

- Price: $$

- Fun Fact: Baytril’s safety data shows that in young calves, there was no articular cartilage damage whereas in puppies less than eight months of age, Baytril can cause joint damage.

• Danofloxacin (Advocin)

- Administered as once or repeated 48 hours later

- Labeled Indications: pneumonia

- Meat Withdrawal: Four days

- Price: $$

- Fun Fact: This short meat withdrawal makes treating fat cattle with pneumonia easier to get to market on time.

The Vet Report is provided in conjunction with Prairie View Veterinary Clinic with locations in Miller, Redfield, Wessington Springs and Highmore, S.D. Questions? Send an email to owner Eric Knock, DVM, at reknock@venturecomm.net or write 321 E. 14th St., Miller, SD 57362.

Dr. Lainie Kringen-Scholtz is Associate Veterinarian at Animal Medical Care in Brookings, South Dakota.

The Vet Report is provided in conjunction with Prairie View Veterinary Clinic with locations in Miller, Redfield, Wessington Springs and Highmore, S.D. Questions? Send an email to owner Eric Knock, DVM, at reknock@venturecomm.net or write 321 E. 14th St., Miller, SD 57362.

Tri-State Neighbor Columnist

Dr. Lainie Kringen-Scholtz is Associate Veterinarian at Animal Medical Care in Brookings, South Dakota.