Salina, Kan.

We are still plugging away at milo and soybean harvest and are slowly making progress. The ground is finally holding us fairly well, but we are still fighting wet milo. So much of the milo is down at this point, and in some areas, it is completely flat. We are cutting so much lower than we would normally to pick up as many heads as we can, that we are putting so much of the plant through the combines. The moisture from the plant is what is causing the grain to be too wet for the elevators. Also, by putting so much of the stalk into the combines, it has considerably slowed the amount we can cut in a day. This has been a constant frustration to all involved.

We did get two row heads and purchased crop lifters for two of the flex heads to help pull in the downed milo. We began cutting a field of milo with the flex heads and realized it was down more than we thought, so we stopped until we got the row heads. We started again with the row heads and picked up at least 25 more bushels to the acre. We expect them to pay for themselves quickly.

We are finding a little bit of shattering in the beans, but nothing like we thought we might at this point in the season and the yields are still good.

We can’t say thank you enough to all our employees and harvest help, including the custom harvesters we hired. They have worked so much through the holiday season so that we can get as much cut as possible. We also appreciate the patience and understanding of our landlords. It has filled our hearts to be surrounded by folks like them.

The calves are doing well on the triticale. Since the combines are cutting the milo stalks much lower, the cows will have a nice mat of finely chopped stalks to eat, instead of the standing stalks.

We haven’t had a chance to attend any meetings or conferences yet, but K-State is offering The Corn School in Salina in January and we will have a couple attend it.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from the Came Farms Family!

Local commodity basis level: Cargill in Salina: wheat, -.15; milo, -.35; corn, -.30; soybeans, -.95. — Darcy Came Bradley