Salina, Kan.

We managed to miss the snow that was predicted for this past weekend, so we are pretty happy about that. We recorded an inch of rain since our last report and there are places around here that are just plumb flooded. The temperatures the last few days have been cold, which froze all the mud. When it is frozen, it makes it so much easier getting cattle watered and checked every day, and getting back and forth from home.

This week, we are planning to move cattle. We have cows that need to be moved to other milo fields and calves that need to be moved to other triticale fields. Shop plans for this week include pulling in the planter and getting started on it. The guys did a lot of maintenance to the semis last week. Cold temperatures are supposed to return by the end of the week, so we have a chance to get back in to cut some more milo.

Bill and his oldest son, Kody, attended the Corn School last week. There was a lot of talk about planting corn later in the spring. By planting later, they are showing an increase in yields, better plant stands, and improved uniformity. We are adding a little more corn to our rotation this year and will probably move our planting dates back, so we will see how it compares to what we have been doing.

There is an Engenia training class coming up in February that all our sprayer operators must attend here in Salina.

Our FSA office had been closed until last week because of the government shut-down. A shut-down like that makes it hard for everyone to get their paperwork in before deadlines. I’m sure it is a nightmare for the FSA employees as well, as they try to get everything caught up.

Local commodity basis level: Cargill in Salina: wheat, -.13; milo, -.35; corn, -.30; soybeans, -1.00. — Darcy Came Bradley